Article Index

1841 Inspections - Mr Chatwin's Button Manufactory

1841 Inspections - Mr Hasluck's Button Manufactory

1841 Inspections - Mr Elliott's Button Manufactory

1841 inspections - Mr Aston's Button Manufactory

1841 Inspections - Messrs Smith and Kemp's Button Manufactory

1841 Inspections - Mr Bullock's Button Manufactory

1841 Inspections - Mr Ingram's Button Manufactory

1841 Inspections - The Pearl Button Trade

Other inspections - 1841 - all pages

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Employment of Children in the Button Trade

Other inspections - 1841

 

The 1841 reports refer to button manufactories in Birmingham owned by various people: Mr Chatwin, Mr Thomas Hasluck, Mr Elliott (Regent Street), Mr Aston (St Paul's Square), Messrs Smith and Kemp, Mr Thomas Bullock, Mr TW Ingram, Pearl Button Trade 'AB' 

The reports of which these are transcriptions were purchased from an excellent historical documents website, www.lightage.demon.co.uk, which no longer exists. If you know where these resources are now available, please let me know using the 'Contact us' page of this website.


I hope to compile a list of the working people named in these reports - watch this space if you have an ancestor who worked in the button trade as their name may be in the list.

It must be said that these reports are more interesting from a social history point of view than for the button-making details they contain! They make very sad reading - children were employed in this industry, as in so many others at the time, in conditions that were hard and with very long working hours. The inspectors pay close attention to the morals of the workers as well as to the provision, quality and privacy of privies in these factories.

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About us

This web site has been created by Lesley Close as an on-line museum displaying some of the buttons and other artifacts manufactured by Hammond Turner & Sons (and related companies), button makers of Birmingham (and Manchester), England.

Lesley's interest in buttons started when she saw the words 'button maker' in the 'father's occupation' column of her maternal great grandmother's marriage certificate. After rather too many 'ag labs', vicars and sailors, here was a wonderful change of occupation. She thought she might find a picture of a button: instead, she found a picture of the one-time owner of the business and over 200 different buttons made by the company.

What we don't do

The button-making company Hammond Turner no longer exists - we do not make buttons!